Templar Soul Paardenclub Alessia

Bitcoin gifts to Gesta Francorum are welcome on: 1JkWGX3NxGtrds2V2e5ebuCFs5Q8ScrXsF

Bitcoin address
Laatste onderwerpen

Naar het forum

Vrije associatie van onafhankelijke reenactors gericht op
de periode van de Kruistochten

Free association of independent reenactors focused on the Crusades

Association libre de réenacteurs indépendants accentuée
sur la période des croisades.

Bitcoin gifts to Gesta Francorum are welcome on: 1JkWGX3NxGtrds2V2e5ebuCFs5Q8ScrXsF

The so-called Gesta Francorum ("The Deeds of the Franks") or in full De Gesta Francorum et aliorum Hierosolimitanorum ("The deeds of the Franks and the other pilgrims to Jerusalem") is a Latin chronicle of the First Crusade written in circa 1100-1101 by an anonymous author connected with Bohemund I of Antioch.It narrates the events of the First Crusade from the inception in November 1095 to the Battle of Ascalon in August 1099. The name of the author is unknown, but he was a member of the crusading party, either Norman or Italian, recruited by Bohemund of Taranto in 1096 from the duchy of Apulia. His narrative of the trip to Jerusalem, initially under the leadership of Bohemond and then Raymond of Toulouse, was composed and written during the journey. He had the help of a scribe who made occasional edits of his own, and thus the chronicle provides invaluable viewpoints of a knight who was not a high level leader or cleric. The most important historical contribution is the day-to-day events of the journey: tactical operations, provisionings, changing moods of the crusaders, the anti-Greek prejudice, progress of each day. To his literary contemporaries, the anonymous author was a "rustic". Guibert of Nogent wrote his Dei gesta per Francos (1108) based on it, saying the original "frequently left the reader stunned with its insipid vacuity". Robert the Monk of Rheims was later commissioned to re-write the entire work for literary and historical improvements while Baudri of Dol also later re-wrote a version of "this rustic little work". However the original has persisted and today it remains one of the most valuable contemporary sources of the First Crusade.