Affiliates
Templar Soul Paardenclub Alessia

Bitcoin gifts to Gesta Francorum are welcome on: 1JkWGX3NxGtrds2V2e5ebuCFs5Q8ScrXsF


Bitcoin address

De kruistochten een expansiedrang van het Latijnse Westen?

Vorige onderwerp Volgende onderwerp Go down

De kruistochten een expansiedrang van het Latijnse Westen?

Bericht van Godfried van Bouillon op za sep 20, 2008 8:47 am

De kruistochten een expansiedrang van het Latijnse westen???

The Crusades: A Defensive Gesture


Popular perceptions paint the Crusades as an act of Christian aggression toward as alien Eastern culture. Although the desire to enrich Europe with captured plunder and lands, and the desire to spread the faith of Christianity were two important catalysts to the declaration of the Crusades, they were not the actual reasons that motivated these wars. Pope Urban II officially declared the First Crusade on Tuesday, November 27, 1095, with the goal of liberating the land formerly held by the Christians; and the liberation of oppressed Christians in the Middle East. Urban's declaration shows that the Crusades were not an aggressive venture by the Europeans, but rather a defensive move to count what they perceived as a looming threat to their lands and their faith.
Eastern aggression indirectly led to Pope Urban's declaration. After the death of Mohammed, Arab armies began successfully invading other nations. The Koran condemns aggressive acts of warfare, however, and a justification for these violations of Mohammed's principles was needed. Muslim jurists formed the concept of the jihad, or holy struggle, as the sought-after justification. The jihad's objective was to conquer the rest of the non-Muslim world "so that the world could reflect the divine unity [of God]" (Holy War, p. 40).
Under jihad, Arabs "conquered Palestine, Syria, Mesopotamia, and Egypt" (Infopedia, Byzantium). Constantinople survived two sieges, one in the 670s and another in 717-718. After the decline of the influential Abassids, the more belligerent Seljuk dynasty dominated in the 11th and 12th centuries. The Seljuks converted to Islam in the 10th century and controlled most of Iran and Iraq under Togrul Beg (c. 990-1063). Togrul's successors, Alp Arslan (c. 1029-1072) and Malik Shah (1055-1092) extended the Seljuk empire into Syria and Palestine. In 1071, Arslan conducted a campaign that resulted in the battle of Manzikert, where he routed the Byzantines. The battle of Manzikert "was the indirect cause of the Crusades" (The First Crusade, p. 28), heralding Byzantium's loss of control in Asia Minor. This loss of control "lay behind the appeal to the West in 1095" (The Crusades, p. 2). For the next ten years, Byzantium was in chaos and unable to counter the Turks. Then Emperor Alexius I of Byzantium ascended to the throne and waited for a suitable time to launch a counter-offensive against the Turks. By 1095, Alexius was ready to attack the Turks, but he desperately needed soldiers for his army. Alexius decided to send envoys to Urban's Council at Piacenza, who appealed to the assembled bishops and to the Pope to "send members of their flocks eastward to fight for their faith" (The First Crusade, p. 40). It is said that Urban told his audience that "a grave report has come from the lands around Jerusalem and from the city of Constantinople" (The Cross and the Crescent, p. 18), referring to Alexius' request for aid. Urban also stated that

'. . . a people from the kingdom of the Persians, a foreign race, a race absolutely alien to God . . . has invaded the land of those Christians, has reduced the people with sword, rapine and flame. . .' (The Cross and the Crescent, p. 18) Clearly, Muslim aggression acted as a catalyst to Urban's declaration.
The rapid spread of Islam was another impetus to the Crusades. As fellow monotheists, Christians were considered a "People of the Book". Christians remained unharmed during the Muslim expansion, but occasionally were restricted by prohibitive taxes and laws. Many Christians eventually converted to Islam, due to the advantages of being a member of the ruling religions. These Christians were also attracted to a religion whose "theology was far simpler" (Holy War, p. 44), and one that nurtured "a new culture of great power and beauty" (Holy War, p. 45). Within a century of their conquest, Syria and Palestine were mostly Islamic nations. These conversions acted as the justification for the concept of jihad, feeding the need for Arab expansionism. In time, Muslims dropped the doctrine of jihad and developed trading and diplomatic contacts with non-Muslim nations. By then, the rapid spread of Islam was viewed with anxiety by the Christians.
To the Christians, Islam was absorbing Christianity with an alarming speed, "conquering countries which had been strongly Christians with ease" (Holy War, p. 42). A paranoia arose, with the jihad becoming "a bogey in the West for centuries" (Holy War, p. 42). This paranoia is exemplified best by Edward Gibbon's account of Sultan Abd al-Rahman's defeat at the "Battle of Poitiers" by Charles Martel in 732:

. . . the Rhine is not more impassable than the Nile or the Euphrates, and the Arabian fleet might have sailed without a naval combat into the mouth of the Thames. Perhaps the interpretation of the Koran would now be taught in the schools of Oxford, and her pulpits might demonstrate to a circumcised people the sanctity and truth of the revelation of Mahomet. From such calamities was Christendom delivered by the genius and fortune of one man [Martel]. (Holy War, p. 42) Gibbon seemed to have been under the belief the al-Rahman's intention was a continuation of the jihad, which was false. The Sultan "had been invited into Christendom by Eudo, Duke of Aquitaine" (Holy War, p. 42), and had no intention of continuing the jihad or conquering Europe. Muslim historians only refer to the "Battle of Poitiers" in passing, referring "to it as an unfortunate but unimportant little raid" (Holy War, p. 42). The disparity between the two sides show that the Christians were wary of the burgeoning success of Islam. Urban himself denounced the conversions at Clermont, saying how the Muslims "enslaved them [Christian churches/people] to the practice of its own rites" (The Cross and the Crescent, p.18). The spread of Islam was another catalyst that prompted Urban to declare the First Crusade.
Paired with the defense of the faith was the defense of the people themselves. Christians in Muslim-dominated areas were restricted by taxes and regulatory laws. There were occasionally skirmishes between Muslims and their Christian subjects, and lurid reports would inevitably make their way to Europe. Urban coupled the defense of the people with the defense of Jerusalem itself, and proceeded to bolster the First Crusade with it. Urban appealed to the people at Clermont, detailing how

'. . . [the Muslim] has invaded the land of those Christians, has reduced the people with sword, rapine, and flame and has carried off some as captives to its own land, has cut down others by pitiable murder. . .'(The Cross and the Crescent, p. 18) To Urban, the lands of the Middle East and the people of the Middle East were the property of the church, to be defended from the Muslims.
The Crusades were fostered in a climate of concern over the loss of Christian lands and people. The insurgencies upon Byzantium stirred the call to arms, the rapid rise of Islamic converts roused the indignation of Christian Europe, and the tales of persecution of Christians shocked the Christians. These were the reasons Pope Urban II used when he declared the First Crusade. Thus, the Crusades were a defensive counter to Eastern expansion, rather than an aggressive expansion.
"Deus hoc vult!"
Bibliography



  • Armstrong, Karen. Holy War. Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group Inc. 1991
  • Billings, Malcolm. The Cross and the Crescent. Sterling Publishing Company Inc. 1987 (in US, 1990)
  • Infopedia Encyclopedia CD-ROM. Future Vision Holding Inc. 1995
  • Riley-Smith, Jonathan. The Crusades. BookCrafters, Inc. 1987
  • Runchman, Steven. The First Crusade. Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge. 1991
Back to Index

Godfried van Bouillon
Kruisvaarder

Man
Aantal berichten : 50
Woonplaats : Gent
Hobby's : Reënactment
Registration date : 18-09-08

Profiel bekijken http://www.belgiumview.com/belgiumview/tl1/view0001574.php4

Terug naar boven Go down

Re: De kruistochten een expansiedrang van het Latijnse Westen?

Bericht van Godfried van Bouillon op za sep 20, 2008 8:48 am

Deze tekst schreewt om nuancering en verklaringen... wie doet er mee?

Godfried van Bouillon
Kruisvaarder

Man
Aantal berichten : 50
Woonplaats : Gent
Hobby's : Reënactment
Registration date : 18-09-08

Profiel bekijken http://www.belgiumview.com/belgiumview/tl1/view0001574.php4

Terug naar boven Go down

Re: De kruistochten een expansiedrang van het Latijnse Westen?

Bericht van Godfried van Bouillon op wo sep 24, 2008 12:00 am

De kruistochten als tegenaanval van de westerse christenheid
In hun vrijwel onstuitbare opmars hebben de moslims geprobeerd op drie punten Europa binnen te dringen. Over de Straat van Gibraltar kwamen ze Spanje binnen en drongen tot diep in Frankrijk door. Karel Martel versloeg hen in 732 bij Poitiers, maar het zou nog acht eeuwen duren voordat de moslims uit Spanje verdwenen waren. Het tweede punt waarop de moslims hun aandacht richtten was Sicilië. Ze wisten dit eiland in de negende eeuw te veroveren. Maar de Noormannen, die afkomstig waren uit het Franse Normandië, slaagden erin Sicilië in de tweede helft van de elfde eeuw in bezit te krijgen. Tenslotte probeerden de moslims ook via Constantinopel Europa binnen te dringen, en dat lukte inderdaad na 1453. Ze drongen vervolgens ver over de Balkan op en sloegen zelfs tweemaal het beleg voor Wenen, één keer in 1529 en één keer in 1683. Beide keren doorstond de stad het beleg en sinds 1683 begon de terugtocht van de moslims uit Europa. Deze werd pas voltooid in het begin van de twintigste eeuw. Alleen op de Balkan, bijvoorbeeld in Albanië, zijn hier en daar nog groepen moslims overgebleven.
Het opdringen van de islam heeft men in Europa lange tijd als een groot gevaar beschouwd. In de elfde eeuw ging men er daadwerkelijk iets aan doen. De aanleiding was het optreden van de Turkse Seldsjoeken, die toen Syrië en Klein-Azië veroverd hadden. Ze waren pas tot de islam bekeerd en dus overijverig en fanatiek. De christen-pelgrims die naar het Heilige Land kwamen, werden door de Seldsjoeken mishandeld en soms zelfs gedood. Ook Alexius I, de Byzantijnse keizer, voelde zich door de opdringende Seldsjoeken ernstig bedreigd. Hij richtte een verzoek om hulp tot de paus. Deze, Urbanus II (1088-1099), besloot tot een kruistocht tegen de Turken. Op 26 november 1095 riep hij op de kerkvergadering te Clermont op tot de eerste kruistocht. Allen die daar aanwezig waren schreeuwden eensgezind : 'God wil het !' Ridders, burgers en boeren naaiden zich een rood kruis op de rechterschouder, het teken dat ze zouden deelnemen aan deze christelijke heilige oorlog. Na afloop van de kerkvergadering reisde de paus persoonlijk door heel Frankrijk en overal spoorde hij de gelovigen aan, de goede zaak te steunen. Met grote geestdrift gaven velen aan de oproep gehoor. Franse ridders met hun onderhorigen, maar ook Duitsers van de Beneden-Rijn en Normandiërs van Sicilië en Zuid-Italië.
Het was beslist niet alleen geloofsijver dat de kruisvaarders naar het Heilige Land dreef. De ridders hoopten krijgsroem te verwerven, de hoge adel was uit op landbezit en de horigen zouden vrij worden verklaard. De hoge edelen besloten zich eerst zo goed mogelijk tot de strijd toe te rusten en pas dan te vertrekken. Het verzamelpunt van alle legers zou Constantinopel zijn. De voorbereidingen verliepen veel te langzaam naar de zin van het gewone volk. Al in het voorjaar van 1096 verzamelde zich rondom de kruistochtprediker Peter de Kluizenaar of Peter van Amiens een grote bende van avonturiers, die op eigen houtje de kruistocht wilden maken.
Men zag de zeer talrijke, maar ook zeer armzalige benden met angst in het hart langstrekken. In Bulgarije braken de onvermijdelijke gevechten uit, maar toch bereikte het grootste deel van deze volkskruisvaarders Constantinopel. Keizer Alexius liet ze buiten de stad legeren en gaf hen de raad de komst van het grote ridderleger af te wachten. De volgelingen van Peter de Kluizenaar waren echter te vurig en wilden te graag de Turken te lijf om het geduld op te brengen nog langer te wachten. De ordeloze benden trokken er dus op uit en werden door de Seldsjoeken overvallen en gemakkelijk vernietigd. In augustus 1096 gingen de ridderlegers op weg naar het Heilige Land. Tegenover de ridders gedroeg de Byzantijnse keizer zich niet bijster welwillend. Hij vreesde namelijk dat deze ridders misschien wel van plan waren ook zijn rijk te veroveren. De kruisridders gedroegen zich daarop eveneens zeer vijandig en toen bond Alexius in. Hij ontving de hoge edelen in zijn paleis en gaf hun geschenken. Het was echter met grote opluchting dat hij het kruisvaardersleger zag wegtrekken in de richting van Palestina. Tot hun schade bemerkten de Turken dat dit leger van een heel ander formaat was dan de ongeregelde benden waar ze eerst mee te maken hadden.
Het leger van de kruisvaarders rukte langzaam op, steden belegerend en binnentrekkend, en regelmatig slag leverend. Gebrek aan water en levensmiddelen in de zomer en overvloedige regens in de herfst stelden het uithoudingsvermogen van de mannen tot het uiterste op de proef. De gelederen werden door honger en ziekten sterk uitgedund. Sommige edelen bleven in de veroverde steden en behielden die als vorstendommen, bijvoorbeeld Edessa en Antiochië. Tenslotte bereikten ongeveer 25.000 man de muren van Jeruzalem. Na een periode van belegering werd de stad ingenomen. Er werd een verschrikkelijk bloedbad aangericht onder de moslims, de joden en zelfs de christenen. Meer dan 40.000 mensen zouden zijn vermoord. Daarna reinigden de kruisvaarders zich van het bloed, trokken witte gewaden aan en gingen, lofliederen zingend, naar de Kerk der Opstanding .....
Na de val van Jeruzalem in 1099 werd er een koninkrijk van gemaakt. Het werd ingericht als een Franse leenstaat met machtige leenmannen, maar Jeruzalem kon zich slechts met moeite handhaven. In 1187 werd Jeruzalem heroverd door Saladin, de sultan van Egypte. Wel zijn er steeds nieuwe kruistochten op touw gezet. De zevende werd in 1270 ondernomen, maar toen kwam men niet verder dan Tunis. Met de val van Acco of Saint-Jean d'Acre in 1291 beschouwt men de kruistochten als beëindigd.

Godfried van Bouillon
Kruisvaarder

Man
Aantal berichten : 50
Woonplaats : Gent
Hobby's : Reënactment
Registration date : 18-09-08

Profiel bekijken http://www.belgiumview.com/belgiumview/tl1/view0001574.php4

Terug naar boven Go down

Re: De kruistochten een expansiedrang van het Latijnse Westen?

Bericht van Gesponsorde inhoud Vandaag om 2:12 am


Gesponsorde inhoud


Terug naar boven Go down

Vorige onderwerp Volgende onderwerp Terug naar boven


 
Permissies van dit forum:
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen in dit subforum